Monday, July 17, 2017

ICFO Graphene Image Sensor Video

Circuit Cellar publishes a nice interview with Stijn Goossens, one of ICFO developers of graphene image sensor announced in May:

7 comments:

  1. still no actual images from the sensor, just a silicon die bonded to stantdard foundry lcc packaging. and a chunk of comercial computer generated images

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  2. there are many nowadays applications that are already using non-visible light components based upon already existing sensors. please note that the "color" pattern coating is the reason why current sensors (often but not always) will only react on a special part of the full spectrum. the bare sensor cells are much more sensitive. photon efficiency is already quite high in current existing sensors - so where is there still space for any /breathtaking/ improvements...?

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    1. yes, there is. And the CFA is not the fundamental limiter of the sensitivity outside of the visible spectrum.

      That said, graphene is still far away from anything commercial. This technique seems to be more about colloidal quantum dots, not even clear to me what role graphene plays here. Another Invisage, on graphene?

      Well, for now this will help some people get their degrees, and that's fine. One of those days, when most of us are quite old, who knows. May research continue, but please don't stick pictures of smartphones into it just yet. Invisage used to do that. SiOnyx used to do this. It ends in the Trough of Disillusionment.

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    2. The graphene functions as a highly sensitive charge sensor due to its remarkably high mobility and low noise. We show images made with the graphene-quantum dot image sensor in this paper: http://www.nature.com/nphoton/journal/v11/n6/abs/nphoton.2017.75.html

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  3. Thanks Stijn, but this would take $32 worth of beer to read. That's way too much beer to give up for graphene. Do you guys have another version open to public access somewhere?

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  4. @Anonymous - Here's a Video from February that has Graphics to explain the process, Video Clips which might be CGI or from a different Camera, and a few seconds (at the end) that probably shows exactly what you would see: https://youtu.be/szL-ejdpNgU?list=PLWa6uO3ZUweB_LFvUpNPoxUs-9CtqFKN0 .

    The Description of the Video also contains some info from ICFO.

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    1. are you really believing that any image suposed to be from the camera is not cgi, please review this iamges, that are not video but just still images http://www.nature.com/nphoton/journal/v11/n6/fig_tab/nphoton.2017.75_F2.html

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